A New Zealand perspective on workplace transformation

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By Amanda Sterling

Edition 6 - October 2015 Pages 30-33

Tags: human resources • learning and development

The industrial revolution is often remarked upon as the period of the greatest change in how we work and live that we’ve ever seen. The cornerstone of that change was the introduction of steam-driven machinery in the 1700s. Steam meant greater efficiencies, increased production, and unprecedented growth in income and populations for developing countries. It also meant that workers flocked to big cities to work in factories. Craft production, where small quantities of goods were produced by hand at home, became a diminishing art.
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